Biography

Michael V. Pack, Ph.D., is an associate in the firm’s Electrical Patent Prosecution practice group, where he assists in the preparation and prosecution of U.S. and foreign patent applications. Dr. Pack represents a broad range of clients, prosecuting patent applications for U.S. and foreign corporations in many fields, including, e.g., machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), computer vision and image/signal processing, photonics, telecommunications (wireless frequencies-DC-to-daylight, and optical frequencies), medical imaging, remote sensing, cryptography, computers (software and hardware), internet-of-things (IoT), cloud computing, wearable technology, smart devices, and business methods.

Michael has prosecuted hundreds of patents, and relishes the challenges that accompany bleeding-edge and next-generation technologies, as well as developing new strategies to stay in front of the ever changing patent landscape.  In particular, Michael is often sought out to work on the difficult issues in applications requiring a deep knowledge in sophisticated physics and mathematics, such as cryptography (e.g., quantum-key-distribution networks and elliptic-curve-based ElGamal encryption), medical imaging (including X-ray CT, PET, MRI, and ultrasound), and machine learning (e.g., Bayesian networks, convolutional artificial neural networks, and fast approximate-solution methods to NP-hard problems).  Of particular importance in these areas, Michael regularly counsels clients regarding strategies to address the evolving “abstract idea” standard.

Prior to joining the firm, Michael performed research as a Physicist at U.S. nuclear weapons lab, working on subjects ranging from quantum information to remote sensing to radiation hardened laser components/devices.  The broad rang of interest from his research career has uniquely equipped Dr. Pack to quickly discern and explain the key technical points at the heart of given matter, and to incisively grasp which technical arguments best bolster/support the client’s legal position.  As a scientist and graduate student, Dr. Pack’s research projects spanned the whole gamut of sizes (i.e., from the quantum to the meso- and macroscopic) and electromagnetic frequencies (i.e., kHz, MHz, GHz, THz, IR, visible, and UV), a few of which are: (i) in-fiber poled-polymer electro-optic modulator, (ii) quantum non-demolition measurements on optical transitions with kHz linewidths, (iii) MEMs components for RF synthetic aperture radar, (iv) a THz time-domain CT imager, (v) a tractor-trailer size IR-UV Lidar System, (vi) chip-based magneto-optical cooling and trapping of neutral atoms, and (vii) crystal quantum-defect single-photon sources.

Education

  • Georgetown University Law Center (J.D., cum laude)
  • University of Rochester (Ph.D.)
    • Physics
  • University of Rochester (M.A.)
    • Physics
  • Brigham Young University (M.S.)
    • Electrical Engineering
  • Brigham Young University (B.S.)
    • Electrical Engineering

Admissions

  • Virginia
  • Registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Professional Affiliations

  • American Bar Association
  • American Intellectual Property Law Association
  • Optical Society of America

Languages

  • Russian

Citations

Publications:

  • “Transients of the electromagnetically-induced-transparency-enhanced refractive Kerr nonlinearity,” Physical Review A Vol. 76, Page 033835, 2007
  • “Electromagnetically induced transparency line shapes for large probe fields and optically thick media,”
  • Physical Review A Vol. 76, Page 013801 2007
  • “Wide-Bandwidth, Tunable, Multiple-Pulse-Width Optical Delays Using Slow Light in Cesium Vapor ,” Physical Review Letters Vol. 98, Page 153601, 2007
  • “Slow light with large fractional delays by spectral hole-burning in rubidium vapor ,” Physical Review A Vol. 74, Page 033801, 2006
  • “Transients of the electromagnetically-induced-transparency-enhanced refractive Kerr nonlinearity: Theory,” Physical Review A Vol. 74, Page 013812, 2006
  • “Low-distortion slow light using two absorption resonances”, Physical Review A Vol. 73, Page 063812, 2006
  • “Measurement of the χ(2) tensor of GdCa4O(BO3)3 and YCa4O(BO3)3 crystals,” Journal of the Optical Society of America B Vol. 22, Page 417, 2005
  • “Measurement of the χ(2) Tensors of KTiOPO4, KTiOAsO4, RbTiOPO4, and RbTiOAsO4 Crystals,”, Applied Optics Vol. 43, Page 3319, 2004
  • “Measurement of the χ(2) Tensors of KTiOPO4, KTiOAsO4, RbTiOPO4, and RbTiOAsO4 Crystals,” Applied Optics Vol. 43, Page 3319, 2004
  • “Measurement of the χ(2) tensor of the potassium niobate crystal,” Journal of the Optical Society of America B Vol. 20, Page 2109, 2003
  • “Second harmonic generation with focused beams in a pair of walkoff-compensating crystals,” Optics Communications Vol. 221, Page 211, 2003
  • “Instrument and method for measuring second-order nonlinear optical tensors,” Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 74, Page 3250, 2003
  • “Viewing the mathematical structure of gaussian laser beams in a student laboratory,” American Journal of Physics Vol. 69, Page 1169, 2001

Speeches:

  • “A short-standoff bistatic lidar system for aerosol cloud backscatter cross section measurement,” Quantum Electronics and Lasers Science Conference, San Jose, CA, 2012
  • “Implementations of Double-Resonance Slow Light,” Optical Society of America Frontiers in Optics, San Jose, CA, 2007
  • “Implementation of Double-Resonance Slow Light,” Optical Society of America Frontiers in Optics, San Jose, CA, 2007
  • “Transients and Rise Times of the Refractive EIT-Kerr Nonlinearity,” International Conference on Quantum Information, Rochester, NY 2007
  • “Large Fractional Pulse Delays in a Hot Rubidium Vapor,” Optical Society of America Conference on Slow and Fast Light, Washington, DC, 2006
  • “Transients and Rise Times of the Refractive EIT-Kerr Nonlinearity,” Optical Society of America Conference on Slow and Fast Light, Washington, DC, 2006
  • “Observations Cross-Absorption Modulation Mediated by Coherent Population Trapping in Hot
  • Rubidium Vapor,” Quantum Electronics and Lasers Science Conference, Baltimore, MD , 2003
  • “Improved accuracy in measuring d tensors of nonlinear crystals,” Optical Society of America Frontiers in Optics, Baltimore, MD, 2003
  • “The d Factory: a program to accuratel measure d tensors of nonlinear crystals,” ,” Quantum Electronics and Lasers Science Conference, Baltimore, MD, 2003
  • “A MEMs hig-Q tunable capacitor for reconfigurable microwave integrated circuits,” SPIE Photonics West, San Jose, CA, 2003
  • “A 6 to 9 GHz RF MEMs tunable coupled line filter,” Proceedings of IEEE MTT International Microwave Symposium, Philadelphia, PA, 2002

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