Biography

Brendan L. Roach, Ph.D. is a technical advisor in the firm’s Electrical and Mechanical Patent Prosecution practice group where he is involved in the drafting of patent applications. Dr. Roach specializes in medical devices and diagnostics, computer hardware, and mechanical systems.

Prior to joining the Firm, Dr. Roach worked as a research assistant at Columbia University where he investigated the relationship between the chemical and mechanical drivers of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. He coordinated multi-institutional collaborations with biomedical industry partners and departments of veterinary medicine, ophthalmology, mechanical engineering, orthopedic surgery, and reconstructive surgery. To this end, he developed expertise in materials analysis, biopolymers, and cellular biology, with significant experience in techniques including computer-aided design (CAD), 3D printing, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). His diverse training provides a fundamental understanding of a variety of disciplines (e.g., biology, engineering, electronics, mechanics), allowing him to understand a myriad of complex issues encountered by clients.

Additionally, Dr. Roach was a Fellow at Columbia Technology Ventures, the technology transfer office at Columbia University. In this role, he performed technical and commercial assessments of early stage university technologies ranging from green energy to cancer therapeutics, aiding the office’s determination of patentability and market viability.  His work included due diligence, freedom-to-operate and landscape analyses, and technology marketing.

Dr. Roach has drafted multiple successfully funded grant proposals, co-authored more than 20 peer-reviewed publications, presented his work at international conferences, and served as a peer reviewer for a leading orthopedic journal. In addition, he has trained and mentored numerous graduate and undergraduate students and orthopedic surgical residents, advising them in their investigation of independent and team-focused research questions.

Education

  • Columbia University (Ph.D.)
    • Biomedical Engineering
  • Columbia University (MPhil)
    • Biomedical Engineering
  • Columbia University (M.Sc.)
    • Biomedical Engineering
  • Clemson University (B.Sc.)
    • Bioengineering

Professional Affiliations

  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2015-Present

Accolades

  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (2013-2016)
  • NIH T32 Fellowship in Multidisciplinary Engineering (2012-2013)
  • Jonathan Black Undergraduate Leadership Award (2011)

Selected Conference Presentations

  • Roach, BL, et al. Chondroprotection of tissue-engineered cartilage via internal delivery of dexamethasone. 61st Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society. 2015. March 28-April 1. Las Vegas, NV.
  • Roach, BL, et al. The use of genipin to enhance mechanical function of engineered cartilage. 7th World Congress of Biomechanics. 2014. July 6-11. Boston, MA.
  • Roach, BL, et al.  Fabrication of tissue-engineered cartilage grafts with anatomic surface contours for repair of large focal defects. Proceedings of the ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference. 2013. June 26-29. Sun River, OR.

Selected Journal Publications

  • Roach, BL, et al. Dexamethasone release from within engineered cartilage as a chondroprotective strategy against interleukin-1α. Tissue Engineering, Part A. 2016 Apr 22(7-8), pp. 621-32.
  • Roach, BL, et al. Fabrication of tissue engineered osteochondral grafts for restoring the articular surface of diarthrodial joints. Methods. 2015 Aug 84, pp. 103-8.
  • Kelly, TA, Roach, BL, et al. Tissue-engineered articular cartilage exhibits tension-compression nonlinearity reminiscent of the native cartilage. Journal of Biomechanics. 2013 Jul 26;46(11) pp. 1784-91.
  • Roach, BL, Nover, AB, Hung CT. 2016. Agarose Hydrogel Characterization for Regenerative Medicine Applications: Focus on Engineering Cartilage, in Biomaterials from Nature for Advanced Devices and Therapies (eds N. M. Neves and R. L.  Reis), John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • Roach, BL, et al. Bi-unicondylar knee replacement laxity with changes to simulated soft tissue constraints. Proceedings of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers: Part H. 2013 Jan 227(1) pp. 27-36.